A way of life

Elizabeth Berkowitz meets with Terry Greenwood, a farmer from Daisytown, PA whose land and water have been contaminated by natural gas drilling.

 

  “I didn’t have to farm, but I like to do this,” said Terry Greenwood. “For me, it’s a way of life.”    

Terry didn’t sign a gas lease himself; his property had a “never-ending” lease on it, signed in 1921, more than 60 years before he started farming there.    

After the non-Marcellus drilling and fracking started, his water turned a murky brown color, and he lost a calf, and then another, and then another. “When your animals start dying, you know something’s wrong,” he said. He watched them bury a waste pit on his property.  

He lost 10 calves in a row in 2008, many of which were born with visible birth defects including blue and white crystallized eyes with no pupils.    

After Dominion supplied his cattle with a water trough, the next 8 calves born that year lived. The gas company told him the dead calves were “farmer’s luck,” but Terry said that if he had that sort of luck during the decades he’s been farming, he would have been out of business long ago.    

He’s got one calf in a freezer, hoping someone who knows what to look for will test it.    

“Royalty check?” asks Terry. “That’s one hour I can talk to the attourney!” It’s not enough to pay for his drinking water, which he buys for himself and his wife Kathryn after the company stopped paying in October of 2009.    

He’s always been skeptical of the new well that DEP told them was safe, but he’s turned it off completely since it began staining their dishes and corroding the pipe fittings in his house.    

“They’ve run our lives for the last two years,” he said. “My kids said this doesn’t even feel like home no more.”    

Watch Terry tell some of his story:    

Read a brief article about Terry.

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One comment on “A way of life”

  1. […] WENY TV called me yesterday around 6pm and asked if they could interview me about the “Face of Frackland” Blog. They showed up about an hour later (which didn’t give me much time to collect my […]


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